Your Digital Marketing Coach with Neal Schaffer

Why the Future of Content Marketing Isn't What You Think [Georgios Chasiotis Interview]

November 18, 2021 Neal Schaffer Episode 236
Your Digital Marketing Coach with Neal Schaffer
Why the Future of Content Marketing Isn't What You Think [Georgios Chasiotis Interview]
Show Notes Transcript

A lot of us in digital marketing tend to treat content marketing like a digital machine. Create this content and expect these results. Unfortunately, this leads to creating a lot of very average content that everyone else is publishing on the Internet, adding to the noise and not driving any impactful outcome for your business.

Georgios Chasiotis, Managing Director of the B2B SaaS content marketing agency Minuttia, wants to change that. By looking at the current trends in content marketing based on his expansive client work, he wants to give you his advice on:

  • Why "copycat content" isn't going to get you the results that you need
  • What type of content you need to create based on your company's lifecycle stage
  • Why you need to focus on creating a library instead of a publication and how to do that

Ready to significantly improve your content marketing for 2022 and beyond? Then listen in!!!

Key Highlights

[01:20] Introduction of Podcast Guest, Georgios Chasiotis
[04:03] When and Why Clients Come to Minuttia?
[06:48] Is Content Marketing Equivalent to Blogging and Blog Content?
[09:09] How to Avoid Copycat Content
[11:03] Things to Consider When Creating Copycat Content
[13:44] Minuttia's Process On Keyword Research
[18:22] Keyword Strategy for Middle Stage Companies
[20:03] How to Build Topical Authority
[23:05] Guidelines on Library Content
[28:42] When to Expect Traffic Results
[32:12] Content Promotion
[33:34] Connect with Georgios
[34:05] Summary

Notable Quotes

  • Don't limit yourself, experiment with different content from us, find the ones that work best for you and for your audience at the same time, and focus on them. 
  • I think that the way keyword research and topic ideation, or the way we described earlier, people are going to open a keyword data provider and they are going to try to find a keyword. I think this is wrong. Because decisions that most companies make are heavily influenced by metrics such as for example, keyword difficulty, okay? But all these metrics have weaknesses, and you cannot allow these metrics to form your decisions.
  • At that early stage, we would advise the company to publish content that demonstrates the value of the product, or we would advise them to look for guest posting opportunities in an effort to leverage the audience of another website, okay, or arrange co-marketing activities are very heavily focused on content.
  • I would say that when you have very strong indications of product-market fit, and you are like, You know what, we are ready to start growing. This is when you can start investing into content marketing, content creation, SEO and so on.
  • The more firsthand experience you have, the more you understand, for instance, the market price, that influences will charge you

Connect with Georgios Chasiotis

More Info on Neal Schaffer and This Podcast:

Neal Schaffer:

The more content we create, the higher will appear in more search engine rankings, the more traffic we get, and ultimately the more conversions we get. And our business grows through content marketing. Well, unfortunately, it just doesn't work that way. It's not so simple. Find out why the future of content marketing isn't what you think. On this next episode of The your digital marketing coach, podcast. Digital social media content influencer marketing, blogging, podcasting, blogging, tick tocking, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, SEO, SEM, PPC, email marketing, who there's a lot to cover, whether you're a marketing professional entrepreneur, or business owner, you need someone you can rely on for expert advice. Good thing you've got Neil, on your side, because Neal Schaffer is your digital digital marketing marketing coach, helping you grow your business with digital first marketing one episode at a time. This is your digital marketing coach, and this is Neal Schaffer. Hey, everybody. This is your digital marketing coach Neal Schaffer, welcome to another episode of the podcast. Today we have a special guest and we are going to be going deep into content. Now our guest today Georgios Chassidus. He's the managing director of a content marketing agency called minutia Am I n u TT IA, he wants to be referred to as GA, which I call him during the podcast. He is an expert in b2b SaaS content marketing content is equally important for b2c. But for b2b content can really make or break your company. Obviously, when potential buyers are doing research, they need to see content, whereas would be to see, they might be able to see pictures, read reviews, and what have you, which some might be available for b2b Obviously, depends on the industry and the popularity of that company. So we're going to go deep and content, it is b2b SaaS centric, but I believe the principles apply to any business. So I hope regardless of what industry, you'll listen in for some really, really great advice and really a different way of thinking about content marketing, with my guest, Giorgio. So without further ado, let's jump right into the interview. You're listening to your digital marketing coach. This is Neal Schaffer. It's my joy to welcome Georgie Chassidus to the your digital marketing coach podcast. Georgie, welcome.

Georgios Chasiotis:

Thank you very much for having me, Neil. It's a pleasure to be here.

Neal Schaffer:

And I don't think I've ever interviewed someone who is currently in Albania, and about to go to Montenegro, some of the most beautiful parts of the earth. For those that have I've never gotten there. But it's really awesome that you've made the time to talk with me today.

Georgios Chasiotis:

Yeah, we decided to come here and we will spend three weeks together with my wife in Albania in Tirana, and two weeks after that, in Gaza, Montenegro have never been to any of these countries. First time so very interesting to see what we will, you know, see

Neal Schaffer:

if you can travel safely. It's a great time because after this Coronavirus ends, all the hotels and airplanes are going to be booked up so alrighty, but moving on to the topic at hand. Today, Georgie is the managing director of minutiae, which is a b2b SaaS content marketing company based out of Greece. I know he's obviously not in Greece right now. And I'm really excited because all you do, obviously, for your clients is content marketing. So there's no better expert to talk about content marketing than yourself. Content marketing has been around for a while now. And we are entering 2022 What is sort of the lay of the land? When clients come to you? What are they looking to achieve? And how are you helping them? Let's start there.

Georgios Chasiotis:

Yeah, the truth is that, to answer your question, most clients come to us with a very specific goal in mind. And that goal is to increase your traffic in most cases, because they if we're talking about SAS, they want to increase the number of signups they get for free trials or deck demo requests and so on. So the primary, you know, goal, the primary reason why people come to us nowadays is we want to increase our traffic. And I would say that people and companies never come to are going great. In most cases. Sadly, companies are not proactive when it comes to con marketing when it comes to SEO when it comes to marketing in general. I would say you hear companies do marketing when things are not going so well. Okay. But at the same time, like where we are at right now. We have the luck to have clients coming to us and They are going very fast. They just want to accelerate things. But I would say that the primary goal is increase the traffic, because with the ultimate goal, obviously of getting more signups leads whatever is their their business metric that they are evaluate this effort against.

Neal Schaffer:

So if they just want to get more traffic, why don't they just do Google ads and social media ads?

Georgios Chasiotis:

That's a very good question. I would say that not to put you on the spot here. No, I would say that they understand deep down, we all know that all people know that. There's nothing better than organic. And once this thing, it will take a while. Obviously, it's not an instant gratification thing like PPC, you open PPC ads, and you see results the very next day, it's not like that. But when it starts kicking in when you start seeing organic traffic coming, like, nothing can compare to that. And at the same time, I would say that it's one of these channels with the lower the lowest maintenance costs, like you get it. And you don't have to fit it all the time. Obviously, you need to do something such as acquire backlinks, and so on and so forth. But I would say that these things will come if what you have to offer is good enough. So the argument here is that organic traffic deep down, they know it that it's one of the best acquisition sales, this is why they want to test it, they want to try it and they want to see what it can do for their business.

Neal Schaffer:

It's the gift that keeps giving, isn't it? Yeah, you couldn't say like that? Yeah, yeah. So now, you are a content marketing agency. And we're talking about generating more traffic for a b2b SaaS companies. Do you equate in that equation? Do you equate content marketing with just blogging and blog content? Or is there something more to it?

Georgios Chasiotis:

That's a very good point. We started with just blog content. Nowadays, we have moved to other con formats, and we are constantly trying to experiment. For example, we have seen that in some cases, LinkedIn can be very powerful in terms of sharing personal stories of the founder, or from some team members from the marketing team, and so on. But for the most, for the most part, I would say our bread and butter is, you know, creating blog posts for the websites blog. But I would say that, if we're talking about Khan marketing in general, you shouldn't limit your efforts. And at the same time, you need to find what are the common formats that work best, based on what your business is all about, and so on. But you seem limited to just blog posts, you should find the ones that work best for you, and at the same time, makes you feel comfortable. For example, some people may not feel comfortable in front of the camera. Okay. I love being in front of the camera. So for me, it makes sense that I will do something that includes video. Okay, but that's not the case for every person out there. So I would say that, yes, as an agency, our main focus is blog content. But my advice is, in general, don't limit yourself experiment with different con from us find the ones that work best for you and for your audience at the same time, and focus on them.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, it reminds me of a I won't name, the name, but a very famous Facebook expert. And when I had a conversation with him, he mentioned that at the time, a majority of his traffic came from an infographic which came from Pinterest. So generating traffic, obviously, search engine is the first thing we think of but there's a lot of different ways leveraging content to generate traffic. And that's really the definition of content marketing. Right? Not just limited to blogging, although we often equate it to blogging these days, don't we? Yeah, yeah, I agree. I agree. Okay. Okay. So I'm a new b2b SaaS company. And I see that all my competitors are blogging about x. So I need to blog about x as well, please create content around x. I think you'd agree that we see this sort of copycat content. It's a syndrome. It's it's very popular to do, I'll admit that I'm sometimes guilty of it as well. Now, in going into 2022. What is sort of your policy about I understand, are doing keyword research, you're going to come around with similar themes in your competitors are doing similar research. How do you avoid that copycat content, which obviously isn't going to serve you? Well?

Georgios Chasiotis:

That's a very good point. Copycat content is I think, a term that was first introduced by ICANN marketing agency animals, and it refers essentially to content that's very similar to what's already out there. And so for you as a new b2b SaaS company, as you mentioned, let's use a hypothetical scenario here and assume that you are an invoicing SAS, okay for small businesses. One of the first things that you would do naturally is open a keyword data provider such as sem rush, such as a truss and start looking for terms that you can cover through your through your content. Okay? I would say that this is the first mistake. And the reason why this is a mistake is that because unavoidably especially in the beginning, it will lead you to creating copycat content. Because let's face it in the beginning, you are a new SAS company don't have the resources to create something noteworthy, okay, and so you will try to do what your competitors out there are doing. But if you think about it, from a very realistic standpoint, it's not fair, really hands realistic to set the expectations that I can compete with those guys, because they exist for years, they are doing it over a very long period of time, and they know exactly how to make it work, okay, all you can do is that you can emulate what they already have, and even use a condom optimization tool in the process, which by the way, if you care about getting organic traffic, you should do the the difference here is how you do it. And I would say that, especially when it comes to copycat content, we have to consider a couple of things. First of all, at least as of today, copycat content works in many cases, it works. Okay, let's face it, but it's kind of a loop. And we have to start wondering, it works. But until when, when is Google going going to understand that, you know what, I see that these guys are trying to do what this guy over here is doing successfully, okay, because they have created an amazing piece of content. So until when Google is going to allow that this is one of the things that you need to consider when you're creating that looks exactly or it's, you know, similar to what's already out there. At the same time, what you need to consider when it comes to Comic Con is the fact that it's not linkable, it's not terrible, people are not going to link back to it, refer to it through their own content, or search for it. Because let's face it, there is nothing noteworthy there, there is nothing to share or talk about or refer to, and so on and so forth. And the third thing that we need to consider either is that copycat content cannot help you differentiate yourself from competition, it's really obvious. But by doing and by trying to do exactly what other websites have done before you other SaaS companies, in our example, invoicing, SAS companies, will not help you differentiate yourself. And one of the things that you need to do especially in the beginning, you need to try to differentiate yourself, because let's face it, you're not going to open a new category. Okay, most categories are already covered. And if you think that you're going to open a new category, chances are that you're not okay. You just think that what you are introducing to the world is noteworthy and new and innovative, that everyone is going to hug you and they are going to use your product. But the truth is that it's very rare nowadays to open a new category. So I would say that all in all, you should try to stay away from doing what everyone else is doing, if you want to get results out of your marketing, con marketing efforts.

Neal Schaffer:

So based on that analysis, normally a company would do the keyword research, they would obviously figure out the keywords they want to target, they would see what's out there. And that's sort of what tends to create the this copycat content. If they don't do that, then what sort of process would you recommend they do? Is it let's forget about the keyword research. Let's think about those ideal keywords that our prospective customers might be looking for that differentiate our features are? Well, what's sort of the process you go through with your clients?

Georgios Chasiotis:

I would say that it heavily depends on the lifecycle stage, that the company is set, the resources that it has, and so on and so forth. But once you mentioned keyword research, let me just say something very quickly here that I think is very important. I think that the way keyword research and topic ideation, or the way we described earlier, people are going to open a keyword data provider and they are going to try to find a keyword. I think this is wrong. And the reason why this is wrong is because the decisions that most companies make are heavily influenced by metrics such as for example, keyword difficulty, okay? But all these metrics have weaknesses, and you cannot allow these metrics to form your decisions. Because let's say that you are a new company, okay? And essentially, your website has no authority whatsoever, and it's very difficult to compete on a specific category. Okay, let's say that you are an invoicing SAS as we mentioned earlier, what if the keyword difficulty for a particular keyword is very low? Okay. That doesn't mean anything to you. And the reason for that is because keyword difficulty is going to let you know how difficult it is for you to rank for that specific term solely based on the number of referring domains, aka backlinks that competing pages on the SERP have, okay, so I would say that, at an instant, you can see that all these metrics have weaknesses, but companies are not in the position to identify those weaknesses. And for example, do keyword research using weights for the different metrics that they use to form their decisions? Okay, so, to answer your question, I would say that the topics that you're going to cover and how you're going to do it heavily depends on the lifecycle stage of the company, for example, if we are talking about an early stage company, honestly, I would say that focusing on content that's created prepared for a search audience is not the optimal way to go about things. Okay. Because at that stage, chances are that your website, as I mentioned previously, doesn't have any authority whatsoever, which means that you cannot be competitive on the SERPs. Okay? At the same time, you don't need scale ability, you don't need high volume of visitors coming back to your website, every visit matters. So I would say that at that early stage, we would advise to the company to publish content that demonstrates the value of the product, for example, customer stories, case studies, and so on. Or we would advise them to look for guest posting opportunities in an effort to leverage the audience of another website, okay, or arrange co marketing activities are very heavily focused on content, such as run a webinar with another company, or create an e book with another company. Okay. So I would say that only know how you will do con marketing heavily depends on the lifecycle stage, you're at your resources, and so on and so forth. But we find the way, most of the companies approach this effort, and you're correct. For most of the companies, this process starts, okay, we're going to do on marketing. But we're going to do we're going to publish blog posts on our blog, because this is what other companies are doing all the other things that things that you're doing, for example, you're running a podcast for many, many years. Now, these are not so easy things to do. Not everyone can do them. So I would say that they start from blog posts, and one of the easiest things to do is open a keyword data provider and say that, okay, we're going to try to target the easy, let's say, to rank for keywords, and call it a day. But unfortunately, this is not how thanks for

Neal Schaffer:

Gotcha. So I think it's really interesting you talking about the type of content you need to create based on your company's lifecycle state. So startup, you have no domain authority, talk about the value of your product, don't worry about the SEO aspect, but through guest posting, expose your company to new audiences, slowly build those backlinks, it makes a lot of sense. I'm assuming at the more mature stage, where you've already picked up a lot of domain authority, you actually can compete for those, you know, high volume keywords. But what about in the middle there? At what stage? Do you start to shift? If you're a middle state, you know, middle stage cycle,

Georgios Chasiotis:

I would say that if we're talking about SaaS companies, b2b sales companies, we what we say is that the perfect timing for you as a as a b2b SaaS company to start investing more into Khan marketing and content that's created for search audience is after you find you have very strong indications or finding a product market fit, okay, and the reason why this is important, I will just give you an a reason why this is important. You know, what are the use cases that your customers, you know, get the most value out of? What are the best features for your product, and at the same time, you can describe them, you can say that if we are talking about an invoicing software, people may be looking for invoicing software or best invoicing tools for small businesses or how to generate or how to create an invoice in Word, okay, you at that point can be there from a search google search standpoint and give the answer to what to what people are looking for. So I would say that when you have very strong indications of product market fit, and you are like, You know what, we are ready to start growing. This is when you can start investing in into Khan marketing, Khan creation, SEO and so on.

Neal Schaffer:

That makes a lot of sense because most I mean, we're talking about SAS startups. The product is evolving with their client base right there. They assume they have a product market fit, but it actually comes it evolves over time, doesn't it? And therefore once they find those killer features that their customers really like They can really hone in on those with their content.

Georgios Chasiotis:

Yeah, exactly. And also the they can create educational content on top of that, in order to be in the position to build topical authority. Because if we're talking about if we're talking about in our example, an invoicing software, okay, most companies, what they do is that they will create a landing page that targets the targets the term invoicing software that has a commercial value. And obviously, they will get signups hopefully through that page. But the truth is that if you don't manage to be associated with that specific topic that you're interested in, in the eyes of Google, which, by the way works with associations, you will not be able to manage to rank for the terms that are the most important to you. And the way to achieve that is by creating content that's dedicated to that specific category that you want to become a topical authority at.

Neal Schaffer:

So invoicing software for small businesses, invoicing software, for Google Docs, whatever it is, right?

Georgios Chasiotis:

Yeah. And not only that, but as I mentioned previously, you could cover the whole spectrum, because we don't have only when it comes to the search intent and the way people are searching now, nowadays, online, we don't have only terms with commercial search intent, such as invoicing software for small businesses, but we also have content and search queries with informational search intent, what these add, how to achieve that, and so on, and so forth. What I'm saying is that if you want to be associated with the topic of invoicing, invoicing software, I am a company that helps small businesses generate invoices, then you have to help Google make the right associations. And the way to do that is by building topical authority. And the way to build topical authority is by creating sort of speak a small library on your website around all the topics that are interesting. Interesting, too. Yeah. And

Neal Schaffer:

that was another point that we discussed beforehand is this need to focus on creating a library instead of a publication? So it's not just saying, Oh, I wrote my blog post on invoicing software, I'm done. Why is when you say create an library, let's take a step back. Because by the way, everybody listening, obviously, we're talking about b2b SaaS, but this is equal to any company this can be applied to, obviously, in any industry, even b2c, this notion of, of generating topical authority in the eyes of Google or search engines is what we're talking about. So how do you define that library? So let's take the invoicing software example. How many pieces of content what what do those look like? And I know that there's no one given, you know, absolute number, but what are some of the guidelines that you give companies, because I'm also a big I call it a library content as well. It's a central part of the way that I do business that I help clients as well. I'm just curious as to how how you define it for companies that come to you what would be the next steps in developing it?

Georgios Chasiotis:

First of all, let me just say, take a step back here. And let me just say that this concept of the first time, at least, I was introduced into that concept of building a library, instead of publication was when I read a blog post written by Jimmy Daly, from Super path, who said exactly that yet, that essentially, you start, you have to stop treating your blog as a publication, like Forbes, for example, and start treating it as a library instead. Okay. And let's assume in our example, that you are an invoicing software for small businesses, your goal then should be or could be at least to create the best library online when it comes to small business, accounting, and financing. Okay. Now, I would say that, at least until you get to a certain level, it wouldn't make sense to talk about everything around running a small business, because it's very tempting. And many businesses, what will they do when they are going to perform keyword research is, let's find everything that includes the term small business inside, and let's start creating content about it. But I would say that this is wrong. Okay. You can create a con piece, for example, on how to do marketing for a small business, just because you assume that this is relevant to your audience. And it may be but if you want to do things, right, and if you want to start building a library, instead of a publication, you should avoid that temptation. And at least in the beginning, for the beginning, unless you unless you reach a certain point, and you have all the resources that you need in order to create a publication instead, I would say that you should focus and be very focused with your efforts. I would say that we see that most of the companies and once again, it's very tempting to start Going term after term when it comes to the general category that you consider that you are at, like the example that I mentioned. But if you take it from a resources and investment time investment and financial investment standpoint as well, it will, it will be way more cost effective for you to focus on just one category, rather than trying to do everything. Because the companies and the websites that you see online that can cover pretty much every term out there, rest assured that they haven't an army of content writers of content editors, and so on and so forth, you chances are that you cannot do that. So I think that at the end of the day, it's really smart to go with a library instead of a publication.

Neal Schaffer:

It is there a guideline in terms of number of pieces of content that you would recommend to have around a specific subject to gain topical authority, obviously, the more the better independent on the subject, there just may not be that much to write about. But is there sort of a guideline that you give or expectation that you give clients in terms of, you know, what they need to do in order to be able to build that library and therefore gain some topical authority in the eyes of search engines?

Georgios Chasiotis:

I will tell you what, in general, we help our clients understand what are the limits of what we're trying to achieve. But this heavily depends on the category as well. For example, I think that I heard while back that Healthline, which is a pretty big website has 200 blog posts on just April's they are talking about April's not every website that may be interested in you know, diet and things like that can produce 200 blog posts on just April's so I would say that it heavily depends on the topic. Our job as a service provider is to come in and inform our clients, let them know that these are the limits. And this is what we have to do in order to get there. It's never easy, of course, and especially we're talking about new websites, it's really painful, and you need to be committed to the effort, you need to be all in in order to see the results. Recently, we had a client who came to us, it was it's a SASS company from and they are building a technology around patent writing. And so here, it's pretty easy for us for a topic like patents, or trademarking, IPS, and so on to say that these are the limits, essentially, these are the topics that we need to cover, obviously, no guarantees that when we will cover all these topics, boom, an explosion in traffic will happen. But we know that the limits are there, they are visible for us to see. In other cases, if we're talking about about very broad topics, the limits may not be so visible to see at first. So I would say that these two, the answer to your question is specific to the topic that we are trying to, you know, compete for, and the category and competition and, you know, what is it that people may be looking for around that topic?

Neal Schaffer:

Sure, I can imagine, and I've had some very, very niche b2b software companies where it's limiting. I mean, there's only so much around that. So yeah, I totally get that. What about in terms of managing expectations in terms of you should start to see more traffic in three to six months or in one to two years? Obviously, this varies as well. But I'm just curious as to what guidelines you give your customers?

Georgios Chasiotis:

Very, that's a very complex topic, because

Neal Schaffer:

I'm sure they ask you every time right? Yeah, yeah, definitely. This

Georgios Chasiotis:

is one of the questions that we that we get. And honestly, I understand why they are asking they they need to have something, mostly companies, you know, or people who talk to us are either the director of growth inside the company, or director of marketing or something like that, something in this in those lines, they need to know, let's say that we start today, when can we expect to get results. In our experience, if we are talking about new websites with you know, very low visibility online, and very low authority, I would say that you definitely need to spend somewhere around nine to 12 months, even though that's not, you know, limited or shouldn't mean anything at the end of the day. But in our experience, this is when you you can expect to get some results. This is at least the expectation that we tried to set. We know that depending on how fast the client is willing to go, we are more most likely going to see results earlier. But obviously we're not going to commit on that because you know, it wouldn't be right. It wouldn't be ethical and it wouldn't be good for us to need to have the difficult conversations later on. You know why you said that? It's going to come at six months for example, why didn't come right, but it depends because if We're talking about websites that have a topical authority that have a very strong profile in terms of their backlinks, and so on and so forth. Obviously, results are going to come way faster, every case is different. But I would say if we're talking about a new website, and a no very consistent effort, nine months to 12 months, even though that shouldn't be restricting, or that doesn't mean anything at the end of the day, it's based just on our experiences. Yeah, I

Neal Schaffer:

think, you know, I was just reflecting as you were answering these questions that there are a lot of quote unquote, content marketing experts that would have come on this interview, and said, If you do this, this, and this, I can guarantee you that, and it just doesn't work that way, right. And I think this is, you know, everything related to social media and digital marketing. The problem is, you have competitors that are trying to do the same thing. And that's what sort of muddies the water you never know what they're gonna do. And going back to those keyword research tools, yes, it may have that keyword difficulty of that, at this instance. But tomorrow, I guarantee you, it's going to be a different number, because the rankings change all the time. And you know, Google's are always experimenting. So it requires a little bit of science, but a lot of art, and a holistic understanding of the surroundings. And with experience, you become like the Yoda, and you could say, Hey, we've done this before with this client, we might get similar results we may not. But that's how we based on nine to 12 months on. So it's just a really, really good reminder for everyone listening. And I said this, especially in the age of influence of influencer marketing, the more firsthand experience you have, the more you understand, for instance, the market price, that influences will charge you it's the same with content and search engine rankings, right? The more you do this, for multiple companies, the more you get a sense as to okay, we sort of get a feel as to what the algorithm, how it works, obviously, no guarantees, but this is the direction we should go. And I really love how you layered these multiple, you know, stages, depending on your stage, your content needs are going to be very, very different. And the tactics are going to be very, very different. Georgia has been a fantastic conversation. Is there anything, the topic, the title that we agreed on is why the future of content marketing isn't what you think? Is there anything that we missed? When we imagine that title that we haven't talked about? Or did we cover everything,

Georgios Chasiotis:

maybe one of the things that we missed will is about con promotion and promoting your con because, you know, many companies we have seen that they spend a lot of time and they do the work, let's say quote unquote, when it comes to concretion, but when it comes to con promotion, you know, nothing, they will just hit the publish button and call it a day. That's it. But I would say that con promotion, that's a that could be a completely different, you know, topic for for another, it's definitely something that you need to consider. We have seen, especially lately, we have seen great results with it through social media, for example, promoting our blog on social media. And nowadays, we are pushing our clients towards this direction.

Neal Schaffer:

And I'm assuming that obviously, having a list email marketing, or even direct outreach, definitely can also override results as well, all these things.

Georgios Chasiotis:

And obviously, when something is owned by you, like, as you mentioned correctly, an email list. Yeah, that's the best thing. Like, no one can prevent you from reaching your email least. And that's a that's a beautiful thing to have a server. Yeah, obviously.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah. And it's a reminder that you know, for any other authors that are out there, writing a book is 20% promotions 80%. And I think we should treat our blog content the same. So thank you so much, Georgie. So how can our listeners if they want to find out more about yourself minutiae? Where should they go?

Georgios Chasiotis:

Sure. So first of all, you can find me on LinkedIn, I'm trying to be active there is George's facilities. And at the same time, if you want to find our website, read our blog, or you can reach municipios comm Double T, and see what you're publishing what we are up to. And lately, we launched a new podcast, the SAS SEO, so feel free to find it on Apple podcasts, YouTube, subscribe, and yeah, we'd love to hear from you.

Neal Schaffer:

Beautiful. Well, thank you so much. You're You're an amazing resource of knowledge. Hopefully others will tap into as well. Congrats on lunch, the new podcast, we'll have all these links in the show notes. For those of you listening, and hey, once again, thank you so much, Georgie. Thank you. Alright, I hope you thoroughly enjoyed that interview. I know if you're big into content marketing, blogging, SEO, you might have geeked out a little bit as I tend to do during these interviews. But I think that we tend to think of digital as there's this roadmap, and as long as we follow all the signs and go according to the directions, everything's successful, and it really doesn't work that way. We need the same holistic perspective that we need for everything else in digital and social media marketing. Alright, everybody. Well, I hope you continue to subscribe to this podcast. If you haven't, please make sure you press that subscribe button. I really appreciate all the one For reviews that this podcast has gotten, I know by the number of downloads that there's still a long way to go in terms of asking and converting, that's my own conversion metric of reviews. But if you haven't done so I'd really appreciate you taking a minute out of your day. Just to go into your favorite podcast player and say, Neil, I appreciate you I learned so much from whatever episode or I enjoy listening to episodes about this topic or that topic or whatever it is. Podcasting could be sort of lonely, I'm not gonna lie, like any other content creators, so getting that feedback really does make my day. Alright everybody. This is your digital marketing coach. Neal Schaffer signing out. Bye bye. You've been listening to your digital marketing coach, questions, comments, requests, links, go to podcast dot Neal schaffer.com. Get the show notes to this and 200 plus podcast episodes at Neal schaffer.com to tap into the 400 Plus blog posts that Neil has published to support your business. While you're there, check out Neil's Digital First group coaching membership community if you or your business needs a little helping hand. See you next time on your digital marketing coach.